University of Michigan requires proof of vaccination and a negative COVID test for indoor sporting events

ANN ARBOR, MI – Starting January 1, the University of Michigan will require proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative test for all indoor sporting events.

The school cites a recent spike in COVID-19 cases across the region as the reason for the new protocols.

Face masks will continue to be a requirement and must be worn indoors at all home events, officials said in a statement.

Guests 12 and over must present either a government-issued vaccination card with their name and date of last administration, a photo or digital copy of an official vaccination card, or a negative COVID-19-PCR or rapid test before entering any indoor facility, which was administered by a health professional within 72 hours of the event, officials said.

The university’s faculty is being asked to view the ResponsiBLUE app to confirm that it is meeting UM COVID-19 vaccination requirements, officials said. Students must show their valid MCard.

Those who fail to provide evidence of vaccination or a valid COVID-19 negative test will not be allowed to attend an indoor Michigan Athletics event, officials said. These mandates remain valid until further notice. In a notice of the change, UM officials said no refunds will be given, but those who don’t have a vaccination certificate or a negative test can transfer their tickets to others.

Related: Michigan State Requires Proof of Vaccination or COVID-19 Negative Test To Attend Sporting Events

To find a vaccine location near you, visit VaccineFinder.org. To find a testing site near you, check out the state’s online test search, email [email protected], or call 888-535-6136 between 8:00 am and 5:00 pm on weekdays on.

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