Detroit Police Increasing Patrols This Summer to Address Drag Racing, Gun Violence

The Detroit Police Department is developing a five-point plan to tackle large crowds this summer, with Interim Police Chief James White at the forefront of the effort. At the top of the list is the increasing police presence across the city. Mayor Mike Duggan has approved 4,000 hours of overtime for patrol areas such as Greektown and Riverfront, as well as other destinations that attract large gatherings.

In addition to increased police presence, the plan also includes stricter noise abatement, stricter surveillance of drag racing, involvement of community members, and enforcement of parking lots and regulations.

I’m the boss and you know my problems are not transition problems, ”said White, who was appointed to his post by Mayor Mike Duggan in early June. “These are issues I need to address in order to enforce the laws of this city.”

Sticking to drag racing, gun violence

Officers were given 2,000 hours of overtime to patrol drag racing and drifting. DPD confiscated nearly 40 vehicles that year as speeding vehicles drove into “Motor City” and sometimes published their activities online. According to White, the city’s Real Time Crime Center monitors about 150 employees who monitor social media for illegal street races and motorists who burn out at intersections.

We couldn’t go to West Bloomfield, and you and I are dragging up and down a private road, which is putting local residents at risk. Put the children in danger. I don’t accept that, ”said White.

White heads the department at a time when gun violence is increasing in Detroit. Police confiscated hundreds of illegal weapons this year, and murders and non-fatal shootings have increased.

There’s an upward trend across the country, “said White. “We are currently working on the plan. We are building our crime strategy and using our resources to try to contain this crime and identify these violent predators of our community. “

“Because the state opened up afterwards COVID, it gives the impression that you can come into town and these laws will not be enforced. ”- Mayor Mike Duggan

With pandemic restrictions lifted across Michigan, Detroit officials prepare for more commercial and recreational activities and the crimes that follow.

We don’t have time for a learning curve or transition. We need leadership that can act immediately, ”said Duggan. “Because the state opened up afterwards COVID, it gives the impression that you can come into town and these laws are not being enforced. “

Duggan points to recent Greektown fighting and drag racers who have traveled from Kalamazoo to Detroit as the type of activity the city is trying to stop.

We don’t want to arrest anyone. We’re here to say that everyone in this city can enjoy any part of the city, ”added Duggan.

Dependent on community support

DPD also enforces noise regulations, curfews and parking violations. The department issues a ticket to the parking lot owners to stop the activities. Shops and vehicles could be on display for music after 10 p.m. if younger residents are expected to leave the street.

Anyone aged 17 or under who is under curfew should not be on the street at night, ”said Deputy Police Chief David LeValley. “Parents are responsible for knowing where their children are, so we will enforce parental responsibility too.”

Police expect concerned citizens to help in their efforts to facilitate neighborhood partying and other illegal activities.

We’re here to make the city safe from downtown to Grosse Pointe to Eight Mile to Telegraph, “said Arthur Edge of Detroit 300.” Our goal is to ensure the quality of life for the citizens of Detroit. “

With the historic rise in gun violence across our city, we know it takes a unique and strong partnership with the community to build a safer Detroit without incarceration. ”- Alia Harvey-Quinn

MAKES Detroit, another community group, is running a series of “Peace Walks” to increase presence in the neighborhood. Director Alia Harvey-Quinn leads a series of Friday marches throughout the summer in areas such as Joy Road near Rouge Park, Livernois and 6 Mile, Gratiot and 7 Mile, and Campus Martius.

With the historic rise in gun violence across our city, we know it takes a unique and strong partnership with the community to build a safer Detroit without imprisoning people, without imprisoning people, without paying fines, “she said.

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